Free ePUB Cré na CilleAuthor Máirtín Ó Cadhain – Avengersinfinitywarfullmovie.de

M irt n Cadhain s irresistible and infamous novel The Dirty Dust is consistently ranked as the most important prose work in modern Irish, yet no translation for English language readers has ever before been published Alan Titley s vigorous new translation, full of the brio and guts of Cadhain s original, at last brings the pleasures of this great satiric novel to the far wider audience it deserves In The Dirty Dust all characters lie dead in their graves This, however, does not impair their banter or their appetite for news of aboveground happenings from the recently arrived Told entirely in dialogue, Cadhain s daring novel listens in on the gossip, rumors, backbiting, complaining, and obsessing of the local community In the afterlife, it seems, the same old life goes on beneath the sod Only nothing can be done about it apart from talk In this merciless yet comical portrayal of a closely bound community, Cadhain remains keenly attuned to the absurdity of human behavior, the lilt of Irish gab, and the nasty, deceptive magic of human connection


10 thoughts on “Cré na Cille

  1. Fionnuala Fionnuala says:

    I don t usually pay attention to the disclaimers at the beginning of novels, the statements about any resemblance to actual persons living or dead being purely coincidental However, when I was about half way through the English translation of this novel about a village graveyard in Connemara during WWII, I opened the original Irish version of the book and the disclaimer there s none in the English version jumped out at me N l aithris sa leabhar seo ar aon duine d bhfuil beo n marbh, n arI don t usually pay attention to the disclaimers at the beginning of novels, the statements about any resemblance to actual persons living or dead being purely coincidental However, when I was about half way through the English translation of this novel about a village graveyard in Connemara during WWII, I opened the original Irish version of the book and the disclaimer there s none in the English version jumped out at me N l aithris sa leabhar seo ar aon duine d bhfuil beo n marbh, n ar aon chill d bhfuil ann. It s the usual formula that the novel is not modelled on any known persons, living or dead, but having already read half the book, the word dead sounded like a huge joke because the characters are just that all dead And there s an additional clause in this disclaimer nor is the graveyard in the novel modelled on any known graveyard As if we might all be familiar enough with graveyards to recognise individual features and that we might imagine we know this one As if graveyards might have personalities Who ever heard of such a thing Well, M irt n O Cadhain has imagined such a graveyard, and he gives it a mighty personality Periodically throughout the book, a preachy self important voice which calls itself the Trump of the Graveyard , warns about the fate that awaits all those who are consigned to its clay A gloomy doomy message, no doubt about it But the reader soon ignores these proclamations because it is clear that none of the people buried in the graveyard can hear the pompous Trump That s obvious, you might say, since they are all dead But no, it s not so obvious The reason they can t hear him is because they are all too busy shouting about their own issues which ironically have little to do with death and decay In this chorus of voices the book has no descriptive or linking passages , the first and loudest voice belongs to seventy year old Caitr ona Ph id n who dies just before the novel opens We listen as she wonders about how her wake and funeral were conducted, and in which part of the graveyard she has been buried Did her son pay a full pound and bury her in the best part Or did he only pay fifteen shillings for her grave in spite of her many requests She cannot bear to think that he might have paid as little as ten shillings and consigned her to the paupers corner But she very soon forgets these worries because she finds she has a neighbour, the woman who lived next door during most of her lifetime, and now that she knows exactly where she is buried in the fifteen shilling plot she begins to do what she did all her life gossip and complain about everyone she ever knew The dialogue between the two women is interrupted as other voices enter the conversation, the voices of all the neighbours and relatives who died before Caitr ona, and eventually those who arrive after her The book becomes a shouting match as each voice seeks to be heard, some recalling endlessly their final illnesses, others boasting about the size of their gravestone or denigrating the poor souls who have no marker on their grave While I was reading this book, I was on holiday in the west of Ireland where the book is set, and one day I found myself in an old graveyard very like the one described in the story, complete with the ruins of an old abbey just as on the cover of the book Such graveyards are often situated on hilly ground and the older graves tend to be scattered about in no particular order Sometimes they have headstones to mark the space, sometimes not, so it s very difficult to walk about without stepping on a grave I was extra careful where I trod because the main character in the story, Caitr ona Phaid n, has no marker on her grave In spite of having requested a fine cross made of granite from the Aran islands, poor Caitr ona gets no gravestone of any kind The result is that the grave digger frequently tries to bury someone else in her space which irritates her hugely In fact, Caitr ona is permanently irritated with life, with death, with the world and the afterworld Death hasn t changed her in the least She respects no laws of God or man, and fears nothing except not having the status she thinks she deserves Her irreverence was interesting because salvation and damnation were keen preoccupations among certain sections of Irish society in the 1940s but the author has deliberately chosen to ignore that side of mid twentieth century Ireland He describes his characters as completely free from religious scruples apart from one pious character who is speedily ignored by all the others The characters do mention religion once in a while but only to compare the amount of times the local priest might have visited a sick person s house or the amount of prayers he might have said at someone s funeral but there is no concern among the voices of the graveyard with heaven or hell.So any thoughts the reader might have about dying being associated with a deeper interest in spiritual matters get knocked on the head pretty thoroughly We soon discover that the after death life of the characters is the same absurd run around as the before death life, and that it is filled with the same inclinations and petty preoccupations, the same loves and hatreds Hatred for authority, especially the local guarda or police, and for the circuit court judges, and the law makers in the big city Hatred for enemies, especially the historical enemy that was Britain though everyone in the village has relatives who ve emigrated to find work there Some of the characters are so bitter towards Britain that Britain s enemies this is set during WWII are seen as friends This is incomprehensible to the French pilot whose reconnaisance plane crashed in the area and who has been buried alongside these insular villagers Whenever we hear his voice in the early parts of the book, he s speaking French, but gradually he learns some Irish and eventually manages to be partially understood by the rest of the characters which leads to amusing exchanges that are often at cross purposes.Of all the expressions of hatred in the book, the most virulent are pronounced by Caitr ona Ph id n, and her own sister is her main target But the big surprise is that Caitr ona loved as deeply as she hated When we look at the illustration of her by Charles Lamb in the original edition, it seems hard to imagine her as a young woman in love But she was once young and she was once in love She loved Jeaic na Scol ige long before he became her sister s husband And she loved him all the way to the grave Human nature is damnably complicated, and religion and politics are no help whatsoever I think that was O Cadhain s message


  2. MJ Nicholls MJ Nicholls says:

    A classic of the Irish language, and a lost modernist epic, a multitude of voices from beyond the grave narrate this foul mouthed novel, led by the histrionic Caitriona Puadeen, keen to dispel gossip about her character from the longer dead residents of the cemetery A frenetic stream of insults, hearsay, banter, prattle, and bickering, the novel flits from one unidentified voice to another Caitriona identifiable with her oft used catchphrase I m going to burst , split into ten sections with A classic of the Irish language, and a lost modernist epic, a multitude of voices from beyond the grave narrate this foul mouthed novel, led by the histrionic Caitriona Puadeen, keen to dispel gossip about her character from the longer dead residents of the cemetery A frenetic stream of insults, hearsay, banter, prattle, and bickering, the novel flits from one unidentified voice to another Caitriona identifiable with her oft used catchphrase I m going to burst , split into ten sections with occasional lyrical turns from the Trumpet of the Graveyard, who showcases Cadhain s talent for language outside the inventive curses and epithets, creatively rendered into English by Alan Titley Dense in allusions to the politics and references of the period late 1940s , Yale Press plan to release a second annotated translation in 2016, for those interested in further context or outright scholarship and why not In the meantime, this blackly funny novel can be read for its wicked humour and sublime Irish banter by the plain drinking masses, who may never see its like again


  3. Emer (A Little Haze) Emer (A Little Haze) says:

    Cr na Cille was originally written in Irish and published in 1950 It has since been proclaimed to be be one of the finest pieces of modern literature written in the Irish language and I have always meant to read it One tiny problem I hate reading in Irish I know Bad Irish person and all that jazz but yeah That s me Enter this new translation into English HALLELUJAH I know there s another translation available but this one seemed to appealto me.And what an interesting bo Cr na Cille was originally written in Irish and published in 1950 It has since been proclaimed to be be one of the finest pieces of modern literature written in the Irish language and I have always meant to read it One tiny problem I hate reading in Irish I know Bad Irish person and all that jazz but yeah That s me Enter this new translation into English HALLELUJAH I know there s another translation available but this one seemed to appealto me.And what an interesting book this turned out to be It was rather witty and heavy on the black humour so made for an entertaining read The book is basically a bunch of dead people in a graveyard gossiping so there is a lot of backbiting and scandal, and with each newly deceased member of the graveyard comes all those juicy tidbits of information from the land of the living My interpretation of the translation is that it was entirely effective Though it is now in plain English for all English speakers to understand, the turn of phrases are uniquely Irish and feel completely natural Not one part of the novel feels stilted or uneasy with regards to the flow of the narrative A darkly comic adventure in the underworld that speaksabout the living Three stars


  4. Kevin Kevin says:

    A very unique idea and style that I felt was very well translated by Titley, as its meaning is very difficult to interpret in Irish never mind in English My only qualm is that it is unclear, aside from the odd quirk, to ascertain who is speaking in the novel when the story is told in a constant dialogue with no speakers obviously labelled At the same time this is part of the book s unique style yet I couldn t help but find it frustrating and unfocused at times I ll have to read the Irish orig A very unique idea and style that I felt was very well translated by Titley, as its meaning is very difficult to interpret in Irish never mind in English My only qualm is that it is unclear, aside from the odd quirk, to ascertain who is speaking in the novel when the story is told in a constant dialogue with no speakers obviously labelled At the same time this is part of the book s unique style yet I couldn t help but find it frustrating and unfocused at times I ll have to read the Irish original soon so I can compare both editions though, maybe it will give me someinsight into the work Overall it is a very well done and entertaining read and I am only ever delighted to see work being done to bridge the literary gap between English and Irish


  5. Elise Elise says:

    Petty squabbles amongst small minded townsfolk repeated for eternity create an extremely bleak imagining of the afterlife Sometimes funny but mostly an exhausting, plodding experience in spite of all the swear words I felt bad for the French pilot who learned Irish only to engage with these bickering lamers.


  6. Mandy Mandy says:

    According to Colm To b n this book is the greatest novel to be written in the Irish language I have to take his word for that as I ve never come across any other book originally written in Irish, but certainly it s an unusual and quite distinctive novel that feels very Irish to me Shades of Joyce and Beckett, for sure To b n also claims that it s amongst the best books to come out of Ireland in the twentieth century Praise indeed It was published in 1949 but has only now been translated According to Colm To b n this book is the greatest novel to be written in the Irish language I have to take his word for that as I ve never come across any other book originally written in Irish, but certainly it s an unusual and quite distinctive novel that feels very Irish to me Shades of Joyce and Beckett, for sure To b n also claims that it s amongst the best books to come out of Ireland in the twentieth century Praise indeed It was published in 1949 but has only now been translated into English The author is one of the most significant writers in the Irish language but little known outside his native land That might well change with this translation I hope so, as it s a book well worth discovering However I can t say that I actually enjoyed it, although I certainly appreciated its originality Told entirely in dialogue, with no narration, it certainly taxes the reader s concentration, trying to keep up with who is talking All the characters are dead but there s no peace in the grave for them They carry on talking just as they did when alive, preoccupied with all the worries and concerns they had before They only find out what s been going on since they died when someone new gets buried and can join the conversation It s a clever idea, and the author carries it off well, but I did find myself getting tired of the conceit after a while Absurd, quirky and imaginative, but ultimately, for me, a little tedious Updated March 2016In view of there now being a new translation I ve had to write a new review, but there doesn t seem to be a way on Goodreads of distinguishing between the 2 editions So I m adding this new review on to the old oneCre na Cille is regularly flagged as a great Irish novel and according to Colm To b n the greatest novel to be written in the Irish language I have to take his word for that as I ve never come across any other book originally written in Irish, but certainly it s an unusual and quite distinctive novel that feels very Irish to me Shades of Joyce and Beckett, for sure To b n also claims that it s amongst the best books to come out of Ireland in the twentieth century Praise indeed It was published in 1949 but has only recently been translated for general readership into English The author is one of the most significant writers in the Irish language but is little known outside his native land That might well change with these translations, for surprisingly there have now been 2 in the last year or so Alan Titley published The Dirty Dust just a year ago, and it s now in paperback, and this month, March 2016, we have Liam Mac Con Iomaire and Tim Robinson s Graveyard Clay It s an invidious business comparing translations, especially when you re unable to refer to the original, but it s obvious from just a cursory reading that the translators have taken very different approaches Alan Titley has chosen to make his translation quite vulgar and crude, whilst Mac Con Iomaire and Robinson have made theirs a littleliterary For my money I prefer the latter approach I found Titley s constant use of fuck and cunt just too jarring and inauthentic However, that s my personal view and I m not competent to judge on whether one is better than the other This latest translation also has a lot of supplementary material footnotes, a bibliography, publication history and a lengthy biography of the author, which I found very useful and again makes me prefer this most recent edition Alan Titley also includes a good introduction, though So it s really a matter of taste In any case, as readers we can only applaud this renewal of interest in Mairtin O Cadhain and this classic of Irish literature.However I can t say that I actually enjoyed it, although I certainly appreciated its originality Told entirely in dialogue, with no narration, it certainly taxes the reader s concentration, trying to keep up with who is talking All the characters are dead but there s no peace in the grave for them They carry on talking just as they did when alive, preoccupied with all the worries and concerns they had before They only find out what s been going on since they died when someone new gets buried and can join the conversation It s a clever idea, and the author carries it off well, but I did find myself getting tired of the conceit after a while Absurd, quirky and imaginative, but ultimately, for me, a little tedious


  7. Emma Emma says:

    As it turns out, the conversations of the dead is only very interesting for 100 pages or so.The story or stories are found in the dialogue so you have to work for it The reading can be difficult and confusing because there isn t even a Patrick said to guide you You must learn each speaker s style of speech or recall who discusses who what.Anyway, I lost interest eventually because there isn t a whole lot of development in any of the stories We learn a lot about all the different character As it turns out, the conversations of the dead is only very interesting for 100 pages or so.The story or stories are found in the dialogue so you have to work for it The reading can be difficult and confusing because there isn t even a Patrick said to guide you You must learn each speaker s style of speech or recall who discusses who what.Anyway, I lost interest eventually because there isn t a whole lot of development in any of the stories We learn a lot about all the different characters but it s all who hadmoney, who inherited what, who married whom, and so on for the entirely of the book


  8. Heather Heather says:

    The key things to know about this book, which was originally published in Irish in 1949, are explained by Alan Titley in his Translator s Introduction First In The Dirty Dust everyone is dead vii And next It is a novel that is a listening in to gossip and to backbiting and rumours and bitching and carping and moaning and obsessing about the most important, butoften the most trivial, matters of life, which are often the same thing It is as if, in an afterlife beneath the sods, the The key things to know about this book, which was originally published in Irish in 1949, are explained by Alan Titley in his Translator s Introduction First In The Dirty Dust everyone is dead vii And next It is a novel that is a listening in to gossip and to backbiting and rumours and bitching and carping and moaning and obsessing about the most important, butoften the most trivial, matters of life, which are often the same thing It is as if, in an afterlife beneath the sods, the same old life would go on, only nothing could be done about it, apart from talk ibid. So, right it s set in a cemetery, under the ground, and opens with a newly buried woman, Caitriona Paudeen, wondering whether she s been put in one of the expensive plots or one of the cheaper ones Say the same things here as you said at home, says a woman in a neighboring plot, and Caitriona does and so does everyone else 6 Caitriona is bitter about having died before her sister Nell, and isn t at all pleased about being buried near Nora Johnny, her son s wife s mother she clearly sees her son as having married down Other people go on about the things they ve always gone on about everyone is at the center of his or her own world There s a French pilot whose plane crashed he doesn t speak Irish and mutters in French There s the schoolmaster, who tells Nora Johnny stories from romance novels, and is enraged when he hears that his younger wife has gotten remarried There s a guy who s convinced that his favorite team won the All Ireland football match the year he died, and someone else who died later who keeps trying to tell him that they didn t People go on about how they died the guy who was stabbed, the guy who fell from something, the guy whose heart gave out The book is nearly all dialogue, snippets of conversation, and there are parts where everyone s talking about the same thing, communal fixations rather than individual ones thievery things that got stolen, or how the postmistress steamed open everyone s letters, or competitive banter about whose death notice wake funeral wasimpressive, or what they would have done if they d lived a bit longer 281 The graveyard has elections, and there s talk of starting a Rotary with a hilarious proposed list of talks, with each speaker going on about his her personal fixation , but mostly it s a free for all of conversation and argument.While I was reading this, I kept interrupting my boyfriend to tell him about various funny bits, and at one point he said the book sounded interesting but that he doubted he would read it I m not really surprised in general, he caresabout plot than I do, and this book is definitely not plot driven As a character driven atmospheric read, though, it s a lot of fun


  9. Fionnuala Fionnuala says:

    I dipped in and out of this original edition of O Cadhain s novel while reading the English translation I particularly enjoyed finding out what certain characters names were in Irish Tom s Taobh Istigh sounded better than Tom s Inside as the translator renders the name though they mean the same thing I was interested in the place names too some of them are very beautiful Doire Lacha for example, which becomes theawkward sounding Wood of the Lake in the translation.Once I d read I dipped in and out of this original edition of O Cadhain s novel while reading the English translation I particularly enjoyed finding out what certain characters names were in Irish Tom s Taobh Istigh sounded better than Tom s Inside as the translator renders the name though they mean the same thing I was interested in the place names too some of them are very beautiful Doire Lacha for example, which becomes theawkward sounding Wood of the Lake in the translation.Once I d read half the book in English, I was able to reread sections in Irish and understand most of what I was reading Very satisfying


  10. Mark Mark says:

    petty squabbles and town feuds dragged from terrestrial life into the afterlife of the 15 shilling cemetery a unique narrative of voices that would probably work really well as a play, with lots of humor and culture and even irish history to be gleaned from these irritable deceased villagers i ll remember it well, i twisted my ankle.