download Best From Achilles' Heel to Zeus's ShieldAuthor Dale Corey Dibbley – Avengersinfinitywarfullmovie.de

Many words and expressions commonly used in English are rooted in Mythology Dibbley looks at the most colorful ones, briefly recounting the stories of the gods and heroes and their trials and tribulations that inspired them in the first place


10 thoughts on “From Achilles' Heel to Zeus's Shield

  1. David David says:

    E From Achilles Heel to Zeus ShieldDibbley, Dale Corey 044990735XCoverage 4.5 out of 5Scholarship 4.5 out of 5User friendliness 4 out of 5Charm 4 out of 5This unassuming book, an exploration of the way in which the gods and heroes of myth and legend live on in our everyday language, is a real treasure Though it s relatively short 220 pages, 300 root words and phrases , the author manages to pack in a lot of information, in an engagingly natural style that is completely free of academi E From Achilles Heel to Zeus ShieldDibbley, Dale Corey 044990735XCoverage 4.5 out of 5Scholarship 4.5 out of 5User friendliness 4 out of 5Charm 4 out of 5This unassuming book, an exploration of the way in which the gods and heroes of myth and legend live on in our everyday language, is a real treasure Though it s relatively short 220 pages, 300 root words and phrases , the author manages to pack in a lot of information, in an engagingly natural style that is completely free of academic pomposity Features of the book that I found particularly appealing were separate sections on the etymology of days of the week months of the year named for legendary figures chemical elements with mythological names animals and plants with mythological names planets and their moons constellations comprehensive and informative the author s willingness to go beyond just Greek and Roman legends and to include discussion of myths from other cultures as well Egyptian, Norse, Celtic, Germanic, Arabian, and Sumerian mythology are all well represented, even though Greek mythology probably unavoidably is most prominent the author has a kind of discursive style that some readers might find irritating, but which I actually enjoyed, if only because it leads her to include interesting nuggets of information in unexpected places, so that one stumbles across these little Easter eggs throughout the book For example, an entry on being struck by Cupid s arrow provides not only the legend underlying the origin of the phrase, but also discussion of the phrase Cupid s bow mouth , Kewpie dolls, Rose O Neill s Cupid drawings, and the etymology of the word cupidity.One minor quibble although entries are ordered alphabetically, and there is a fair amount of cross referencing, an index would have been a welcome addition Random stuff I learned from reading this book that the male equivalents of caryatids are called atlantes the name of the drug atropine is derived from Atropos she who cannot be turned , third of the three Furies, and the one who cuts the thread of life and brings death seventh heaven is derived from the Koran the drug prescription symbol is derived from the astronomical symbol for Jupiter, This is a fine book 4.5 stars overall


  2. Amanda Amanda says:

    I rather figured this book was old before I looked at the publication info A lot of references in here are dated phrases I ve never heard before crop up as commonplace There is a lot packed into here, and it s a good primer or refresher for Greek Roman myths and legends A little bit of sexism trickles in from time to time male female stereotypes.