The Water is Wide – Avengersinfinitywarfullmovie.de

The island is nearly deserted, haunting, beautiful Across a slip of ocean lies South Carolina But for the handful of families on Yamacraw Island, America is a world away For years the people here lived proudly from the sea, but now its waters are not safe Waste from industry threatens their very existence unless, somehow, they can learn a new life But they will learn nothing without someone to teach them, and their school has no teacherHere is PAT CONROY S extraordinary drama based on his own experience the true story of a man who gave a year of his life to an island and the new life its people gave him


10 thoughts on “The Water is Wide

  1. Alexandra Alexandra says:

    This is probablyof a reflection than a review I read this book when I first started teaching, and my naive and much younger self wanted to be exactly the kind of teacher Pat Conroy had wanted to be one who worked with children who needed me and whose lives I could touch in some way only I would do it better of course My first teaching job plunked me down in a non air conditioned overcrowded school in Little Havana in the heart of the city of Miami, FL for you non natives with 100% of m This is probablyof a reflection than a review I read this book when I first started teaching, and my naive and much younger self wanted to be exactly the kind of teacher Pat Conroy had wanted to be one who worked with children who needed me and whose lives I could touch in some way only I would do it better of course My first teaching job plunked me down in a non air conditioned overcrowded school in Little Havana in the heart of the city of Miami, FL for you non natives with 100% of my students hailing from Cuba, South America, Puerto Rico, etc Well, life imitates art, I guess My first year was a pretty miserable failure and I did not achieve my glorified vision of the Great White non Hispanic Hope Hey, I said I was naive, right They ate my upper middle class white butt for lunch But, man did I LEARN from my kids Hard lessons to be sure, but critical to my nascent years as a teacher That s what this book popping up in my Goodreads wanderings makes me realize Once I learned that I wasn t the only one in the room with something worthwhile to teach, I really became a teacher Sometimes it s better to close your mouth and open your ears and hear what the kids have to teach you I m still naive, thank goodness, and still hope to make a difference with the teachers I prepare to teach I just never assume I m the only one with something to say


  2. Sue Sue says:

    This is an enlightening book and also obviously the book of a young man as it is at times both overwhelmingly idealistic and alarmingly naive Pat Conroy agreed to teach for a year on Yamacraw Island off the coast of South Carolina There he encounters a world apart, conditions unlike anything he has encountered in his teaching on the mainland He is to teach the children of the island, the people who used to live from fishing but now can t support themselves from polluted waters He encounters This is an enlightening book and also obviously the book of a young man as it is at times both overwhelmingly idealistic and alarmingly naive Pat Conroy agreed to teach for a year on Yamacraw Island off the coast of South Carolina There he encounters a world apart, conditions unlike anything he has encountered in his teaching on the mainland He is to teach the children of the island, the people who used to live from fishing but now can t support themselves from polluted waters He encounters children who are savvy but unschooled for all the time they have spent in the classroom He learns of various types of prejudice that attack them individually and as a group in order to keep them untaught and unteachable There is an overarching lack of concern as long as discipline is maintained.Conroy writes of his experiments in teaching methods and his gambles with the authorities to try new activities with the children He also daringly spares the rod This is an eye opening memoir, even though it is no longer a new book It remains a worthwhile read Perhaps my greatest take away from it is to try to know the people to whom I speak, with whom I would like to work or deal The surface definitely does not reveal all.Conroy s prose is beautiful he captures the natural world around him so wonderfully He also captures the individual children and their families so well You will feel that you have met many of them by the time you have finished reading this book


  3. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    I want everybody to read, no listen to, The Water is Wide It is that good a book There are sublime sentences, most often straight out of the mouths of the eighteen black kids whom he s teaching, 1969 970, on Yamacraw Island Daufuski Island , South Carolina Until he got kicked out for insubordination after one year as a teacher That is told at the very beginning so it is no spoiler He is a fantastic teacher He is the kind of teacher these kids needed In the prologue the author says how he I want everybody to read, no listen to, The Water is Wide It is that good a book There are sublime sentences, most often straight out of the mouths of the eighteen black kids whom he s teaching, 1969 970, on Yamacraw Island Daufuski Island , South Carolina Until he got kicked out for insubordination after one year as a teacher That is told at the very beginning so it is no spoiler He is a fantastic teacher He is the kind of teacher these kids needed In the prologue the author says how he felt the narration of his book by Dan Jon Miller was pure perfection It captures the essence of his kids lives It improves what is at bottom a wonderful book He tells his story with humor, yet its topic is very serious


  4. Fred Shaw Fred Shaw says:

    Published in the early 70 s, this is the phenomenal memoir of Pat Conroy as a teacher in 1969, on Defuskie Island, SC His students were all black and mostly illiterate due to an out of sight, out of mind and racist mindset perpetuated by the school board on the mainland Without going into all Pat did for those students, he was fired trying to bring joyous teaching and exposure to the world beyond their island However he did not have the political skills to better the system Because this st Published in the early 70 s, this is the phenomenal memoir of Pat Conroy as a teacher in 1969, on Defuskie Island, SC His students were all black and mostly illiterate due to an out of sight, out of mind and racist mindset perpetuated by the school board on the mainland Without going into all Pat did for those students, he was fired trying to bring joyous teaching and exposure to the world beyond their island However he did not have the political skills to better the system Because this story still has relevance today, it should be a mandatory read by all educators and administrators alike If I could rate all of Pat Conroy s books at once it would save me a lot of time They re all 5 star There is always an undercurrent of his own depression focused on his characters, I think coming from his own life and family All incredible one of a kind stories worth readingthan once not because they re hard to understand, it s because they are soooo good


  5. Negin Negin says:

    Pat Conroy is one of my favorite authors now I loved Beach Music so very much His writing style is just wonderful This book is a memoir Conroy spent a year teaching at an all black school on an island off South Carolina This is the islandand here is the school.He was faced with endless challenges Since it was 1969, racism was a huge problem Another challenge was the awful administration Towards the end of the book, I realized that they made a movie based on this book I now remember se Pat Conroy is one of my favorite authors now I loved Beach Music so very much His writing style is just wonderful This book is a memoir Conroy spent a year teaching at an all black school on an island off South Carolina This is the islandand here is the school.He was faced with endless challenges Since it was 1969, racism was a huge problem Another challenge was the awful administration Towards the end of the book, I realized that they made a movie based on this book I now remember seeing it when I was about eleven so long ago and it made a big impression on me Some of my favorite quotes I learned that politicians are not supposed to help people They simply listen to people, nod their heads painfully, commiserate at proper intervals, promise to do all they can, and then do nothing It was very instructive I could probably have enlistedaction from a bleached jellyfish washed ashore in a seasonal storm No man or woman has the right to humiliate children, even in the sacrosanct name of education No one has the right to beat children with leather straps, even under the sacred auspices of all school boards in the world White guilt, that nasty little creature who rested on my left shoulder, prevented me from challenging Mrs Brown on this or any other point At this time of my life a black man could probably have handed me a bucket of cow piss, commanded me to drink it in order that I might rid my soul of the stench of racism, and I would have only asked for a straw Blacks who have gone through the civil rights struggle have met a hundred white boys and girls who would dive head first in a septic tank to prove their liberation from the sins of their fathers In the fantasy of the races conceived in my mind, all blacks were noble people who had struggled against a repressive social order for years and who were finally reaping the tangible rewards of this struggle All whites, especially myself, were guilty of heinous, extraordinarily brutal crimes against humanity


  6. BAM The Bibliomaniac BAM The Bibliomaniac says:

    I realize this book has an underlying focus on racism in the South in the late 60s, but the other plot line I what resonated with me a gifted teacher unfairly losing his job I lost mine 10 years ago, gosh as long ago now as I taught It was quite difficult for me to read how inspired Conroy was in the classroom, how much he cared about his students and their minds and futures only to be told he s insubordinate and no longer wanted To fire me so insensitively is one thing, but they try to des I realize this book has an underlying focus on racism in the South in the late 60s, but the other plot line I what resonated with me a gifted teacher unfairly losing his job I lost mine 10 years ago, gosh as long ago now as I taught It was quite difficult for me to read how inspired Conroy was in the classroom, how much he cared about his students and their minds and futures only to be told he s insubordinate and no longer wanted To fire me so insensitively is one thing, but they try to destroy my personal reputation YES I know this feeling Conroy and I are both not ass kissers, which in the education system that runs on a political hierarchy , is a much craved expectation All teachers have worked with a Mrs Brown, a Piedmont, an Edna We all have our opinions about these people To me the discrimination was against poverty Sadly in this countryAfrican Americans are found in the lower economic groups These children had no chance And no one cared


  7. Irene Irene says:

    In 1969, Pat Conroy, a young idealistic teacher, accepted a position at a two room school house on an impoverished and isolated island off the coast of South Carolina He is assigned the class of 5th 8th graders The largely segregated school district of which this island was a part, had presumed that these Black children were inherently incapable of learning and treated them accordingly He found a group of 18 students who could not recite the alphabet, let alone read, could not count to 10, le In 1969, Pat Conroy, a young idealistic teacher, accepted a position at a two room school house on an impoverished and isolated island off the coast of South Carolina He is assigned the class of 5th 8th graders The largely segregated school district of which this island was a part, had presumed that these Black children were inherently incapable of learning and treated them accordingly He found a group of 18 students who could not recite the alphabet, let alone read, could not count to 10, let alone multiply, did not know the name of their country, let alone understand its history This is his memoir of that year trying to engage, empower and expose these children to the wider world Conroy obviously cares deeply for these children and is proud of his efforts, so this is an upbeat, funny and heart warming book despite the frustrations of battling a discriminatory system


  8. Jeanette Jeanette says:

    Pat Conroy s memoir of his year teaching 1969 70 It s kids of Gullah dialect S.C island living who don t have cultural context to the English and other subjects, like American History and reading skills that he is trying to teach them He tries to use active trips, other activities which give experience and relate to their family and island life instead of the usual physical consequence and heavily redundant reciting lessons of former and approved school structure So he argues with the boss Pat Conroy s memoir of his year teaching 1969 70 It s kids of Gullah dialect S.C island living who don t have cultural context to the English and other subjects, like American History and reading skills that he is trying to teach them He tries to use active trips, other activities which give experience and relate to their family and island life instead of the usual physical consequence and heavily redundant reciting lessons of former and approved school structure So he argues with the boss Originally I read this years ago and it was a quick reread And I was surprised on how dated I found it now compared to then And rathercondescending than previously came across in the former read from many years ago Conroy was very young and with the Citadel not far behind him but he learns as much as his kids do during this teaching sojourn PossiblyNot being Southern or of such rigid knowledge base and language forms for optimal English as existed at this time and during the year recorded here, I must say something When I read this before I tended to feel he had become enlightened in the sense of his value system and perceptions And he does to some extent But in a larger, much larger picture, I now, in age, compare it to a classroom in which the class does NOT have a common language, be it Gullah or dialect, or standard anything And hold languages that come from at least 3 continents One in which there are 5 or 6 countries of origin and different age levels by 3 or 4 years represented and maybe half not having heard English because they do not even have a TV Well, some of us had TV but weren t allowed to watch muchthan the Variety Hour or Gunsmoke Mainly because of not passing grades of their required and mandatory testing, many are not even in their age appropriate grade level And one in which their foods for lunch brought from home no food at school ever , are nearly unrecognizable to each other One in which students were seated at heat registers for desks because there were not enough desks to go around And where 5 foot 4 inch boys were put into chairs designed for 3rd graders And still those nuns taught us well We learned And I cannot remember ever going on a field trip until seventh grade We also had 60 to 62 per nun in each small classroom More than twice what is considered class room size in the worst schools today And most of these Dominican sisters taught for 40 years in the same place until all of their students were Baptist and not a one was Catholic I just had to give a shout out for them That was a task And all of their students were main streamed even then, too If there were severe disability, we had to take turns teaching each other Because there was too many of us and we did not have cars or buses available, few could even reach any kind of Public school inclusion Few of our parents owned a car Most walked as I did, and we were not allowed to ride bikes, because there was no place to safely put them More than 2 miles each way as I did, be it blizzard or NO air conditioning on a 98 degree September day This book made me realize how muchdifficult it must have been for those women with all those heavy clothes on too Especially in the heat But did they do a good job I wish one of them would have written a memoir


  9. Kellie Kellie says:

    I was really impressed with this book Not only did I enjoy the story, which is true, but I also enjoyed the writing of Pat Conroy This is the first book I have read by Conroy This is about the experience Conroy had in the early 70 s teaching in a one room school house on Yamacraw Island which is the pseudonym for Daufuskie Island , an island off the coast of South Carolina This island was populated by mostly African Americans The experience was truly eye opening It really depicted the so I was really impressed with this book Not only did I enjoy the story, which is true, but I also enjoyed the writing of Pat Conroy This is the first book I have read by Conroy This is about the experience Conroy had in the early 70 s teaching in a one room school house on Yamacraw Island which is the pseudonym for Daufuskie Island , an island off the coast of South Carolina This island was populated by mostly African Americans The experience was truly eye opening It really depicted the society of that time Civil Rights, Segregation and Southern Culture and it s resistance to change Conroy took a true life experience and put in down on paper in such a way that the reader felt like they were there on the island with him Add to that an exceptional sense of humor that was drizzled throughout the story and you have yourself a masterpiece I have added all of the rest of Conroy s books on my wishlist and I feel a little bitwith the program after finally reading one of his works


  10. Maureen Maureen says:

    This was the first Pat Conroy book I read, and several years later, I had an opportunity to spend some time on Yamacraw, the island where he taught school It was a magical place, with sandy roads shaded by great oak trees dripping with spanish moss The people lived in backwards conditions, but they were tied to the land and their relationship with the land and the ocean in a way that few if any of the rest of us will ever experience This is an inspiring, uplifting book and I am a better perso This was the first Pat Conroy book I read, and several years later, I had an opportunity to spend some time on Yamacraw, the island where he taught school It was a magical place, with sandy roads shaded by great oak trees dripping with spanish moss The people lived in backwards conditions, but they were tied to the land and their relationship with the land and the ocean in a way that few if any of the rest of us will ever experience This is an inspiring, uplifting book and I am a better person for having read it,