[[ Download kindle ]] Tooth and ClawAuthor Jo Walton – Avengersinfinitywarfullmovie.de

A tale of love, money, and family conflict among dragons A family deals with the death of their father A son goes to court for his inheritance Another son agonises over his father s deathbed confession One daughter becomes involved in the abolition movement, while another sacrifices herself for her husband And everyone in the tale is a dragon, red in tooth and claw Here is a world of politics and train stations, of churchmen and family retainers, of courtship and country houses in which, on the death of an elder, family members gather to eat the body of the deceased In which the great and the good avail themselves of the privilege of killing and eating the weaker children, which they do with ceremony and relish, growing stronger thereby You have never read a novel like Tooth and Claw


10 thoughts on “Tooth and Claw

  1. unknown unknown says:

    Jo Walton is my new favorite book nerd She s a huge dork for science fiction and fantasy, which you know if you read her wonderful retrospective reviews over at Tor.com She s also clearly a geek for the written word in general, particularly 19th century Victorian era social novels And so, in grand you got your chocolate in my peanut butter tradition, she wrote a book that combines them both, recasting a Victorian novel with anthropomorphic dragons It s a literary mash up with the potential Jo Walton is my new favorite book nerd She s a huge dork for science fiction and fantasy, which you know if you read her wonderful retrospective reviews over at Tor.com She s also clearly a geek for the written word in general, particularly 19th century Victorian era social novels And so, in grand you got your chocolate in my peanut butter tradition, she wrote a book that combines them both, recasting a Victorian novel with anthropomorphic dragons It s a literary mash up with the potential for disaster, but rather than just coming up with a cute idea and shoving it into an old book Oh hahaha what if Anna Karenina was a robot because android starts with the same sound , she reimagined old literary tropes in a new context what if the social t te t tes that make up the action sequences in Austen or Br nte exist not because people were uptight back then, but due to immutable facts about dragon physiology Reading books like Jane Eyre or Persuasion yes, I know, Austen isn t actually Victorian, shut it require a bit of mental exercise because you have to keep remembering context the social strictures that bind the women and their reactions to said help define them as characters But where Anne Elliot has to be careful not to be alone with a man because of what others might think, the female dragons in Tooth Claw have to watch out because close, romantic contact with a male will cause their scales to shift from gold to pink, signaling the end of their maidenhood The story here is nothing new, but rightly so this stuff needs to be familiar if its going to work So we ve got the death of a patriarch, squabbles over an inheritance, three sisters looking to secure a position, a lawsuit over a perceived slight, a challenge against religious ideals But instead of a money or land, the inheritance in question is the consumption of said patriarch s corpse And the sisters need to secure a position lest they be eaten.More than just playing with genre, Walton offers a creative new take on dragon lore, with some of the finest world building I ve seen in any fantasy novel, slotting the rules of dragon society into the Victorian era framework with apparent ease There s so much to enjoy, things you really don t want to spoil for yourself if you re into this sort of thing There s a bit about the different wigs a lawyer dragon wears to perform different functions during a court case that made me snort also, once again, I award bonus points to any book with a courtroom scene that includes an old chestnut like,This is highly irregularThere s a lot of detail about what kind of hats everyone wears, which, DRAGONS in HATS Fancy hats The logistics of why dragons sleep on gold and eat their dead are fascinating and amusing I am hardly a dork for Victorian Lit to wit apparently the real source material, per the author, is Anthony Trollope, but I ve never read him, though Dickens and Charlotte are also obvious analogues but the creativity of this book makes it impossible not to appreciate Walton s wit regardless I d hesitate to call it perfect, but it s very near, right down to the narrator, who lapses into the occasional attentive readers will remember spiel And yes, maybe I would prefer a littleacerbic bite a la Jane, but I don t remember a part in any other book where the narrator politely implored the reader not to storm the publisher s office and rend and eat her Reading this got me thinking how many Victorian era novels could be improved through the liberal application of dragons this idea is totally original, I don t know why you are looking at me that way, Quirk Books To whit 1 Jane Eyre This one is obvious Bertha is being kept in the attic hidden chamber not only because she s crazy, but because she is a female dragon that can shoot flame this is untoward and shocking At the end of the book, she burns down the cave and Mr Rochester loses a wing.2 Wuthering Heights Heathcliffe can just go ahead and eat Catherine s corpse and stop whining over her grave already You share the same soul, why not share the same body, eh 3 Bleak House After lingering on for decades, the lawsuit of Jarndyce and Jarndyce comes to a sudden and unexpected end when the claimants on both sides fight and kill one another in open court and are eaten by the serving class 4 Tess of the D Urbervilles Only Tess is a dragon, and she eats Alec Stoke d Urberville and claims his title She then marries the local parson, Angel Clare, but eats him too, because he is a pantywaist Tess becomes Queen of the Dragons


  2. ✘✘ Sarah ✘✘ (former Nefarious Breeder of Murderous Crustaceans) ✘✘ Sarah ✘✘ (former Nefarious Breeder of Murderous Crustaceans) says:

    Free until May 22 for members of Tor s eBook of the Month Club Sign up and get the book here Read it at your own risk and stuff Trollope meets Austen meets boring as fish dragons How delightfully captivating indeed Quite so, my dear Albertina, quite so. What very oh so slightly pisses me a little off is that this book could have been quite delicious indeed I mean, bloody shrimping dragons As the characters in a Victorian drama So much potential for glorious scrumptiousness here Only Free until May 22 for members of Tor s eBook of the Month Club Sign up and get the book here Read it at your own risk and stuff Trollope meets Austen meets boring as fish dragons How delightfully captivating indeed Quite so, my dear Albertina, quite so. What very oh so slightly pisses me a little off is that this book could have been quite delicious indeed I mean, bloody shrimping dragons As the characters in a Victorian drama So much potential for glorious scrumptiousness here Only that there wasn t a quarter of a third of a half inch of scrumptiousness to be had here Mainly because the fact that the characters are dragons add absolutely nothing to the story And when I say nothing, I mean NOTHING As in, um, you know, naught, zilch, nada and stuff Now now, Gustav, don t be like that You know I have nothing against you personally and stuff Maybe.If the author wasn t there to constantly remind you that the members of her cast fly, sleep in caves, have tails, hoard gold and blah blah blah, you d completely forget that they re not human Some barnacles might argue that I am quite full of fish to make such an outrageous assertion, and that the characters couldn t possibly NOT be dragons, since they have somewhat cannibalistic tendencies Now that I very much approve of Only that I don t see what that has to do with anything I mean, why the bloody stinking shrimp would it be logical and natural and reasonable for dragons to be anthropophagous, but not for humans You Little Barnacles obviously have never set foot in New Guinea I have some lovely Korowai friends there, and believe you me, their idea of a snack is not exactly vegan approved See what I mean Anyhoo and stuff For all its potential lusciousness, I guess you could say that this story turned out to be naught but a lacklustre, unoriginal Victorian drama romance whatever rip off with no charm, no bite and no wit Yes, I guess you could say that My my my, it looks like we have quite the winner in our little pincers here So yay and stuff Nefarious Last Words NLW the next one I want to read about Victorian shenanigans, I ll read actual Victorian shenanigans And the next time I want to read Trollope, I ll read actual Trollope And the next time I want to read Austen, I ll read actual Austen And the next time I want to read about dragons I ll pick up Temeraire where I bloody shrimping left off three years ago and how could I because Temeraire is titillating yummilicious as fish I can be so fishing clueless sometimes I cannot fishing believe it you may breathe now if you wish and if you don t fine by me it s your puny life and stuff you are quite welcome P.S The next time I want to have me some delicious Victorian Tooth Claw cocktail, I ll watch the Good Doctor, thank you berry much Pre review nonsense Well this was quite thrilling, thank you very much indeed Quite so.Full review to come and stuff.P.S My dear Tony Mr Trollope, I am slightly a little put out on your behalf and stuff May 2018 Dragons meet Victorian drama YES, bloody shrimping please Also, this book is super fishing cheap, so yay and stuff P.S Thank thee kindly, Miriam, for mentioning this one to me I shall forever be full of grate


  3. Jo Walton Jo Walton says:

    This was recently published in France, and I m at Etonnants Voyageurs, a Franch literary festival where they always want you to talk abour your most recent book, in detail Since I wrote this in 2002 and didn t re read it since the proofs of the mass market paperback in 2005, I thought I d better re read it to refamiliarize myself with it.I found some errors that I d tweak if redoing proofs, but felt no desire to rewrite And on the whole I liked it It s funny and gruesome, and the voice is cle This was recently published in France, and I m at Etonnants Voyageurs, a Franch literary festival where they always want you to talk abour your most recent book, in detail Since I wrote this in 2002 and didn t re read it since the proofs of the mass market paperback in 2005, I thought I d better re read it to refamiliarize myself with it.I found some errors that I d tweak if redoing proofs, but felt no desire to rewrite And on the whole I liked it It s funny and gruesome, and the voice is clever and this is the book where I did manage to make a going down like ninepins ending sort of work Some things were a bit clunky, but really I think it s fun And it was pretty much unique when I did it, even though there is now a huge category of similar stuff But if you want to persuade French people to buy it, you just have to tell them all the characters are dragons Tout Tout les characters Vraiment Yeah, they re really all dragons I thought that was a good idea at the time, that s why


  4. Sherwood Smith Sherwood Smith says:

    She d like me to bring a dragon home, I suppose It would serve her right if I did, some creature that would make the house intolerable to her This quote, found at the beginning of Tooth and Claw, is from Anthony Trollope s novel Framley Parsonage, published monthly through 1860 1 in Cornhill Magazine, a new periodical aimed at the family market Framley Parsonage, for those genre readers who haven t dipped much past the Freshman Lit toehold in the vast ocean of 19th century novels, comes She d like me to bring a dragon home, I suppose It would serve her right if I did, some creature that would make the house intolerable to her This quote, found at the beginning of Tooth and Claw, is from Anthony Trollope s novel Framley Parsonage, published monthly through 1860 1 in Cornhill Magazine, a new periodical aimed at the family market Framley Parsonage, for those genre readers who haven t dipped much past the Freshman Lit toehold in the vast ocean of 19th century novels, comesor less in the middle of Trollope s Barsetshire series, which follow the lives of a set of primarily gentry and ecclesiastical families in an imaginary English county Framley Parsonage was considered by many reviewers and readers of the time to be a pleasant, pastoral tale, to contrast with the fraughtly moody writings of the likes of Wilkie Collins, also popular at the time The quote Walton chose printed below a splendid poem by Tennyson from the same period was spoken by Lord Lufton, a disgruntled young aristocrat, about his mother This respectable lady had her sights on a daughter in law who would bring a fortune, if not titled relatives, to her marriage with her son the son wanted to marry Lucy, the penniless sister of his best friend, Mark Robards, a parson.Trollope somewhat disingenuously claimed that there was no heroism and no villainy in his novel Mrs Gaskell, wife of a minister and writer of the poignant Cranford and the sublime Wives and Daughters, wrote that she wished it would go on for ever and ever When I first read Framley Parsonage, it did not strike me as gentle, idyllic, or pastoral It was a book about ambition Not one major character in it lacked ambition what varied were the goals and just how far people were willing to go to attain those goals Sowerby, the bankrupt owner of a great estate, connived with legal blackmail to get money enough to stanch the bleeding away of his patrimony Griselda Grantly, the beauty of the countryside, coldly and deliberately sold herself to a fabulously wealthy, titled dolt so that she could reign above everyone as a Marchioness.I mention this novel at length not because Walton has mapped her fantasy directly over it, but because she hasn t The opening of Tooth and Claw is a deathwatch over an old dragon, Bon Agornin the equivalent story point, the death of Mark Robards father, occurs a hundred pages into Framley Parsonage, takes place off stage, and of course does not feature the old pastor s children crowding round to eat his body before it has cooled.Tooth and Claw ambition Though Trollope acknowledged a little tuft hunting in his book, meaning social climbing, the modern reader will be struck how pervasive rank is in every aspect of life, even in the way that the strange, fiery parson Crawley cannot visit his old friend who has been promoted above him There is a secondary thread through the novel wherein the question of the morality of a parson hunting is considered it seems to occur to no one that a lot of people on horseback, aided by a pack of dogs, chasing after a lone fox in order to tear it to pieces is cruel The question has to do with how seemly it is for a parson to be partaking in a pleasure sport reserved for aristocrats.The ritual of eating a dead dragon is what launches the story in Tooth and Claw Bon s powerful and demanding son in law, the Illustrious Daverak, takesthan his share for his own family, despite the wishes of Bon and the claims of Bon s other children, the Blessed Penn the counterpart to Mark Robards , Avan, the brother who works in the city, and the two younger maiden sisters, Selendra and Haner.Avan decides the next day to institute a lawsuit against Daverak Meanwhile Selendra sustains an unlucky marriage proposal from the obsequious Blessed Frelt, the local divine, after which the household is split up, Haner going to live with Daverak and Berend her older sister and Selendra to live with the Blessed Penn and his wife and dragonets.This lawsuit is the backbone of the story, to which we keep returning Avan lives with a delightful and mysterious female dragon named Sebeth who works with him in the city s planning commission and who is a secret member of the Old Religion Yes, religion plays a part in Jo Walton s work, as it does in the Victorian novel, but Walton does not settle for the easy parody of organized religion, made up of fools and fakes, that has become a standard in much genre fiction today.Interspersed between scenes concerning the lawsuit we visit Penn s household, where Selendra and Sher Benandi meet As in Trollope s novel they make friends instantly, he by showing compassion, and she by responding to it another shared plot point is how Sher s mother, the Exalt Benandi, tries to control her son s life and select a suitable mate for him Gelener Telstie is as beautiful as her counterpart, Griselda Grantly, as calculating and dull But even so, the stories overlap here just to wing away again over landscapes that only match at key points Gelener s fate is not at all like Griselda s.The veneer of civilization over savagery is one of the these touchpoints Walton s dragons, despite their titles, their trains, their fancy hats, are not the literary equivalent of cheery plush toys It would have been easy enough to use the Victorian novel as background for a work of whimsy, but one of the pleasures ofTooth and Claw is the world building The hats serve social and even legal purpose, the trains haul platforms for dragons to ride on When these dragons eat, they do not use dragonish teeth to sip tea from porcelain cups, they tear apart their meat, splashing themselves with blood, and channels run down the sides of proper dining rooms to drain off the residue of their meals Males have claws and can breathe fire, females do not Females write, males only with difficulty because of those claws Females mate knowing that a clutch of dragonets can kill them.The book is filled with wonderful touches, glimpses of a world with a past that one wishes would be illuminated instories The narrator, who can see into everyone s head just as in Victorian novels, employs heraldic terms to illuminate the dragons movements The echoes from Trollope s novel add polysemous levels to this reading experience without revealing everything about the ending.Can this book be enjoyed by readers not familiar with Trollope s novel Of course it can No one needs to be familiar with Victorian literature to enjoy a well written story about dragons The pacing is masterful, the characters distinctive, the climax exciting On finishing this book, a reader might very well wish to seek out Trollope s novel and then come back to read Tooth and Claw again


  5. Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ says:

    I m always delighted when Tor s free eBook of the Month Club comes up with a book that was already on my TBR list Here s this month s offering, about the lives and times of a family of dragons Jo Walton is an excellent author so I have high hopes Available to download for free until midnight ET, May 22 Sign up for the book club and download the book here I m always delighted when Tor s free eBook of the Month Club comes up with a book that was already on my TBR list Here s this month s offering, about the lives and times of a family of dragons Jo Walton is an excellent author so I have high hopes Available to download for free until midnight ET, May 22 Sign up for the book club and download the book here


  6. Bradley Bradley says:

    This complex novel finally answers the age old question of what would a Regency Era romance look like if all the characters were dragons.No, this isn t a Novak novel This came out before Indeed, this was popular enough to win the World Fantasy Award and it is well deserved.Far from being a gimmick, the core tail tackles all the original Austen like social criticisms such as inheritance law, marriage customs, a Pride and Prejudice level of anxiety, quips, and misunderstandings, the full issue This complex novel finally answers the age old question of what would a Regency Era romance look like if all the characters were dragons.No, this isn t a Novak novel This came out before Indeed, this was popular enough to win the World Fantasy Award and it is well deserved.Far from being a gimmick, the core tail tackles all the original Austen like social criticisms such as inheritance law, marriage customs, a Pride and Prejudice level of anxiety, quips, and misunderstandings, the full issue of religious practice, slavery, and it even drags the Regency into a modern era level of Equality.As a novel about Dragons.Hell, it succeeds on both levels If you love Regency novels and you love dragons, I m certain you and this novel are going to get along famously I particularly liked the inheritance issue I mean, the peeps in England never LITERALLY let their families eat old, dear papa


  7. Sanaa Sanaa says:

    4.5 Stars This was really spectacular It s a Victorian drama populated with dragons instead of people, definitely my kind of book I think what I loved most about this was how dragon lore and mythology was transformed to work with Victorian societal customs Seriously, it s eerie how well everything worked together even though it was definitely a bit weird The victorian drama plot was also really splendid, and I could never figure out what was going to happen next It definitely has a touch 4.5 Stars This was really spectacular It s a Victorian drama populated with dragons instead of people, definitely my kind of book I think what I loved most about this was how dragon lore and mythology was transformed to work with Victorian societal customs Seriously, it s eerie how well everything worked together even though it was definitely a bit weird The victorian drama plot was also really splendid, and I could never figure out what was going to happen next It definitely has a touch of Austen and Heyer in the writing and overall felt like you were reading a proper Victorian novel, but it didn t rehash well known plots which was great If there is one problem I had with the book is that it did read a little slow at times, and I do wish the book had delved a bit further in the details along with delvinginto some of the characters Overall though I really enjoyed this and would recommend this for lovers of Victorian dramas and fantasy and dragons and fans of the fantasy of manners genre It was so good


  8. Ferdy Ferdy says:

    SpoilersI can see why Tooth and Claw was described as the Pride and Prejudice of the dragon world There were times where I felt like I was reading an Austen novel, a very bizarre Austen novel with church going, hat wearing, high society, cannibal dragons Took a while to immerse into the story and get used to the world The beginning was rather slow and not much seemed to happen apart from a lot of waiting and monologuing The world building and setting was very impressive for the most part SpoilersI can see why Tooth and Claw was described as the Pride and Prejudice of the dragon world There were times where I felt like I was reading an Austen novel, a very bizarre Austen novel with church going, hat wearing, high society, cannibal dragons Took a while to immerse into the story and get used to the world The beginning was rather slow and not much seemed to happen apart from a lot of waiting and monologuing The world building and setting was very impressive for the most part The different social classes, religion, family dynamics, and the rights and privileges of females males aristocracy servants closely mirrored that of the Victorian era, but with a unique dragon twist to them There were some aspects of the world though which was difficult to imagine, such as the dragons riding trains carriages, wearing wigs and fancy hats, doing paperwork, and drinking beer It was too human I don t know how they were able to do half the things they did when they had claws which aren t exactly dexterous Even with that though, it all worked well enough There were some unique touches which I thought were brilliant Such as the eating of dragons by family members after death as consuming dragon flesh would make them stronger and bigger , the dragon lords killing and eating the weak dragons even the babies in their demesne, the parsons eating the eyes of dead dragons as some kind of religious ritual, the females permanently blushing pink red with any close contact from a non related male and that causing all kinds of disgrace and problems if unmarried , and the whole changing wig business in court which was hilarious All those little and not so little things made the world really fascinating and rich Enjoyed the central arc conflict of Daverak eating his father in law s body instead of letting Haner Selendra Avan take what they were owed It was great how it connected and drove the story and characters together There was a quite a lot of family and religious politics throughout, some of it was kind of repetitive, but on the whole it was really interesting to read all about the various politics, structure and etiquette of the dragon society Most of the characters were thoroughly unlikeable, the only ones I really liked were Felin, Sebeth and Berend They were easy to root for, had common sense and weren t precocious little snowflakes That said, I didn t mind the unlikeable characters that much, most of them were entertaining I hated Haner and Selendra though, they were so self centered and horrid especially with how they treated their sister Berend , I wouldn t have minded that so much if they hadn t been utterly boring as well Their POV s really bought the story down for me, all their parts were unbelievably slow, whiny and dull.Haner s reaction to Berend s death in particular irked me, she wasconcerned about her own problems than her sister dying in childbirth I suppose I was meant to feel sorry for her but I didn t She was a complete cow And Selendra was a boring Mary Sue as much as dragons can be Mary Sues who everyone fawned over It was only her future mother in law Exalt Benandi who hated her, and even that wasn t satisfying since Selendra ended up putting her in her place by the end Ugh, I was hoping that the Exalt would somehow fuck her over I wanted some comeuppance for that rapey Frelt fucker, the fact he ended up with his dream wife took the piss I hated himthan Daverak Thought it was funny how the yarge turned out to be humans, I expected that to be the case, but I loved how it was confirmed at the end with the Exalt Benandi being so thoroughly terrified and disgusted when she saw the yarge ambassador and how flat and small he was , it was definitely my favourite scene What was with those stones Selendra Wontas Sher saw after they escaped the cave I thought something would come of them but nothing happened Were they actually yarge or dragons or a threat or something How did dragons dance without touching each other or being in close proximity to each other Shouldn t all the females have turned pink just by dancing Or was the dancing done at a far distance or something It wasn t ever explained Definitely an entertaining read for anyone who d want an Austen cannibal dragon mash up of sorts


  9. Jessica Jessica says:

    People keep referring to this novel as Jane Austen with dragons which is misleadingit s not Jane Austen, it s Anthony Trollope, as Walton says in the acknowledgements The difference Well, for those of you who haven t read Trollope myself included this is a Victorian novel, not Regency In fact, I thought the whole time that it had strong shades of Charles Dickens in it Family strife, extreme stress on rank and duty, wives giving up their personal preferences in order to support the People keep referring to this novel as Jane Austen with dragons which is misleadingit s not Jane Austen, it s Anthony Trollope, as Walton says in the acknowledgements The difference Well, for those of you who haven t read Trollope myself included this is a Victorian novel, not Regency In fact, I thought the whole time that it had strong shades of Charles Dickens in it Family strife, extreme stress on rank and duty, wives giving up their personal preferences in order to support their husbandsit s all there Only these are dragons Dragons, talking about the suitability of this or that marriage, issues with their estate, as they feast on raw meat in a dining room that has blood gutters cut into the floor Dragons, wearing respectable hats with little veils and turning down social engagements because they are in mourning It s genius, it s hilarious, it s moving, it s a true feat on the part of the author Despite their physical and social differences from anything I d encountered before, the characters were still endearing, or irritating, or angering I was rooting for the young, nearly dowerless sisters to make good matches, pulling for Avan to successfully sue his brother in law for taking too much of his father s legacyof course, that legacy was how much of his father the brother in law ATE The contrast between the staid respectability of the dragons and the fact that they ate their dead, and sometimes the living who were too weak, could have become ridiculous, but instead it made it all thepoignant These are dragons, red in tooth and claw , and yet they ve backed themselves into trap with their extreme manners and social s This is a truly gripping read, and I recommend it for anyone, whether or not you like dragon books or Jane Austen Or Anthony Trollope whose books I am now eager to try


  10. Olivia Olivia says:

    This is unlike anything I ve ever read in fantasy.If Jane Austen, or maybe Charles Dickens, felt the sudden urge to write a fantasy book about dragons, this is probably what they would have written It has everything daughters who need to marry, a lost inheritance, etiquette, romance, a greedy family member, a confession, and charming characters Onlythey re all dragons And they also eat each other.If any of that sounds at all intriguing to you, please pick this up It s short, charming, wi This is unlike anything I ve ever read in fantasy.If Jane Austen, or maybe Charles Dickens, felt the sudden urge to write a fantasy book about dragons, this is probably what they would have written It has everything daughters who need to marry, a lost inheritance, etiquette, romance, a greedy family member, a confession, and charming characters Onlythey re all dragons And they also eat each other.If any of that sounds at all intriguing to you, please pick this up It s short, charming, witty and heartwarming.Jo Walton takes dragon lore and mythology and makes it work with the customs in Victorian society The world building is delightful The characters are charming The society is, frankly, amusing We ve got lords and ladies, only they re all dragons did I mention everyone in this book is a dragon But they sit at tables, drink tea and travel in carriages Just making sure, I definitely mentioned that and they all attempt to thrive in society either via their profession or the partner they choose to marry They go to church, they have servants, oh and, they eat the weak and the ill to better their race Dragon meat helps smaller dragons grow, only to eat, you must already be big and strongand please don t forget to wear the proper hat.I ve enjoyed this read a lot and recommend it to fans of the Classics just as much as I recommend it to fantasy fans